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What’s Wrong With Your Pa$$w0rd?

Lorrie Faith Cranor studied thousands of real passwords to figure out the surprising, very common mistakes that users — and secured sites — make to compromise security. And how, you may ask, did she study thousands of real passwords without compromising the security of any users? That’s a story in itself. It’s secret data worth knowing, especially if your password is 123456 …

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2 CONVERSATIONS

  1. I always use the same two words for ALL of my passwords … and never had a problem …

    ‘Password Manager’

    … and though off topic – if people do not understand the importance of a good and strong password to protect their data (they don’t – they really don’t) – is there any surprise that they don’t think about privacy on social networks, being tracked by #adtech software, don’t care that the FCC is seeking to change the rules of net neutrality …. its all happening now and nobody is talking about it ….

    as Joni had it …. ‘you don’t know what you’ve got till its gone’

  2. The best passwords I’ve seen are ones that use an obscure reference to some past event that you’ll never forget. Here are some examples —

    (1) Before the internet was what is is, using an old home address was very secure.

    (2) Nursery rhymes work well too. And then there is the gibberish pattern.

    (3) Remember learning to type on a typewriter? Remember those key exercises such as “asdf…asdf…asdf….”. That gibberish works well as excellent passwords.

    The more obscure, the better.

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