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Two Stories on How Intentions Breed Behaviors

What we intend shapes our thoughts and actions and what eventually happens to us.

Three friends were walking at night and they noticed a man digging a hole. The first friend said that man was trying to bury a victim whom he killed deep in the ground. The second friend said no and the man was trying to keep his money safe in the hole. The third friend said no and this man is trying to make water well. The friends explained the same event each in accordance with his intentions. They had no proof and yet volunteered to explain the same event differently.

We are quick to judge and with so little information and believe our assumptions.

The problem is when we dig a hole for others for us to fall in the hole. A second story explains what I mean.

A water seller used to walk around with a clayey pot in an old market to sell water for thirsty people. The man very kind and established a reputation of being sage. The chief of the tribe heard about him and decided to appoint him to serve drinks to his guests. The man became very popular with the chief because he offered him great advice that helped the chief take the proper decisions. An advisor to the chief felt very jealous. The senior man spoke discretely to the water seller that the chief complained to him because he had a smelly mouth. He advised him to tape his mouth. The man did for few days. One day the chief asked his advisor why the water seller taped his mouth. The advisor said that it was because the man complained to him that the chief has a smelly mouth. The chief became very angry with the man (again believed the story of the advisor without verification). He decided to punish him to death. The next day as the seller man was leaving the chief thanked him for his excellent services. He gave a red rose to take home. The advisor saw the water seller leaving with the red rose. He ran behind him and took the rose saying it was meant for him. The water seller yielded and the advisor hurried out. He did not know that the chief instructed his guard to kill the man who walked out with a red rose. The guard killed the advisor.

Our intentions can lead us to fall into the hole that we dig for others.

We need to enhance our need for cognition and think carefully.  We should be careful not to allow our intentions to drive us into deep holes.

Ali Ananihttps://www.bebee.com/@ali-anani
My name is Ali Anani. I hold a Ph.D. from the University of East Anglia (UK, 1972) Since the early nineties I switched my interests to publish posts and presentations and e-books on different social media platforms.

6 COMMENTS

  1. Intriguing !!!
    In common parlance, “making the trial to the intentions ” means judging someone based on what one believe he/she intended to do, not what actually he/she did or is doing, while no one, apart from the person concerned, can know exactly what has intention to do.
    And so what? Better to reflect before thinking: it is a paradox, okay, but reflecting is more than thinking, it is a thing that takes time and involves many mechanisms within us, thinking is a mechanical thing that sometimes is done without realizing . For this reason, in my opinion, this paradox teaches us not to act, or not to judge, or suppose the intentions of others.

    • So interesting your comment is Aldo and your advanced definition of reflection “Better to reflect before thinking: it is a paradox, okay, but reflecting is more than thinking, it is a thing that takes time and involves many mechanisms within us, thinking is a mechanical thing that sometimes is done without realizing .”

      I questioned once the value if reflection if the mirror is turbid or cracked. Can a person with a cracked mirror reflect sensibly?

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