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The Migration Issue

Climate change is advancing inexorably, making living conditions in vast areas of the planet increasingly difficult – sometimes impossible. As if that weren’t enough, the countries most exposed to natural disasters and famines are also the least stable politically and socially. As a result, their citizens may soon have no choice but to abandon the homes they grew up in to seek a better future elsewhere. Creating, as has been estimated by experts, an immense migratory flow that could reach 1.2 billion people by 2050, with all the burden of human suffering and international tensions that this entails.

Today the characteristic of migratory flows is mainly conditioned by the increase in expulsion factors: poverty and misery, the loss of the resources necessary to live, political repression, religious persecution, homophobia, exploitation and new forms of slavery, wars, terrorism, climate change, desertification or flooding.

The migratory flow takes on ever-increasing dimensions, depopulating countries, and villages, or entire regions and states. The alarm is justified and it is a duty to guarantee assistance and protection to those who flee and ask for help, but this duty also includes acting on the factors of expulsion/attraction, otherwise, if the causes are not eliminated, the alarm becomes chronic, it spreads and grows until it explodes.

Some territories severely tested by wars, internal unrest and institutional instability, in all likelihood will not be able to deploy the resilience necessary to face extreme environmental conditions. This group of countries is already trapped in a vicious circle where competition for scarce resources creates conflict, and conflicts lead to further resource depletion. The consequence is that 1.2 billion people could find themselves forced to emigrate elsewhere to ensure decent living conditions.

All this will have a considerable social and political impact not only on developing countries but also on industrialized ones, given that mass movements will increase migratory flows towards richer states.

Security policies and rejections, do nothing but raise the price of the trip, increase the risks, suffering, and violence, and leave those who flee and those who ask for protection in the hands of those who trade in human beings, inside and outside our borders, opening a highway to the market of illegality, corruption, human trafficking, new forms of slavery that negatively affect every area and place of our society.

We can then say that the question concerns the collective consciousness: immigration is an international question, in deeds rather than in words and intentions, and it forces everyone to commit to resolving it. The walls, the barbed wire, and the fortified borders are not only inhumane, but they are also useless. The course of history cannot be stopped but it can certainly be governed, and governing, in this case, means precisely starting to reduce inequalities and injustices, social and climatic imbalances, ensuring that every person, at every latitude, can live a free and dignified life: work, live, have guaranteed education and health care. Only in this way can migration be contained within physiological limits, stop being a desperate mass exodus that no wall or law can ever stop. To govern global phenomena, global responses are needed,

The question, of course, is complex. For example, addressing the issue of migration starting from the daily news, although it is essential, given the many emergencies that follow one another, the landings, the rescue at sea, and the mass exodus from wars or floods, does not allow for an overall vision. and deep of the phenomenon and therefore, with difficulty, overwhelmed by these emergencies, we will be able to identify answers capable of changing the course of events.

It is, therefore, necessary to make a further effort, framing the migratory phenomenon in its entirety, considering it part of our life experience and an integral part of our future project, maturing the awareness that peace, well-being, and security will greatly depend on how we will be able to defeat the factors of expulsion and attraction that force millions of people to flee their homes.

The tools, the knowledge, and the rules to take the right path are already at our disposal. For over a century, first with the League of Nations, then with the birth of the United Nations Organization, an international regulatory system has been created based on the repudiation of wars, on peace, and on universal human rights, which represent the foundations of government. of the planet, the fruit of the will of states and nations. We, therefore, have an articulated set of rules, agreements, treaties, and conventions in order to be able to apply the principles and values of equality, freedom, justice, and the universality of human rights.

We must overcome resistance, fears, selfishness, and partisan interests, responding to sovereignists and nationalisms by relaunching multilateralism and the cession of national sovereignty in favor of regional to global integration, giving rise to a profound reform of the model of development to make it sustainable and at the service of the needs of the whole of humanity, reformulating economic and commercial policies according to the reduction of inequalities and the growth of cooperation and solidarity.

It is up to all of us, in this time stingy in hospitality, to recognize in the face of migrants that of millions of “poor Christs” in need of hospitality and humanity, and to build with them and starting from them a more just future, where every person is welcomed and recognized in its dignity and where the hopes are, no longer the fears, the engine of our choices and our actions.

The migration issue thus tackled, in its entirety, with a systemic and universal vision, an integral part of the experience of the human family, will allow us to live with an orderly, regular, safe migration, but above all as a free choice and no longer as an escape.

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Aldo Delli Paoli
Aldo Delli Paoli
Aldo is a lawyer and teacher of law & Economic Sciences, "lent" to the finance world. He has worked, in fact, 35 years long for a multinational company of financial service in the auto sector, where he held various roles, until that of CEO. In the corporate field, he has acquired skills and held positions as Credit Manager, Human Resource Manager, Team leader for projects of Acquisition & Merger, branch opening, company restructuring, outplacement, legal compliance, analysis and innovation of organizational processes, business partnerships, relations with Trade Unions and Financial Control Institutions. After leaving the company, he continued as an external member of the Board of Directors e, at the same time, he has gone back practicing law and was a management consultant for various companies. He has been also a columnist for newspapers specializing in labor law, automotive services and work organization. His interests include human behavior in the organizational environment, to the neuroscience, the impact of new technologies, the fate of the planet and people facing poverty or war scenarios. He loves traveling, reading, is passionate about many sports, follows the NBA and practices tennis.

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2 CONVERSATIONS

  1. This is a great post, Aldo.

    You have a balanced approach that I wish you could have presented to the COP27 held in Egypt right now.

    The two balancing forces are what you mentioned are reflected in your post
    “Today the characteristic of migratory flows is mainly conditioned by the increase in expulsion factors: poverty and misery, the loss of the resources necessary to live, political repression, religious persecution, homophobia, exploitation and new forms of slavery, wars, terrorism, climate change, desertification or flooding.”
    The above is coupled with the fact that “This group of countries is already trapped in a vicious circle where competition for scarce resources creates conflict, and conflicts lead to further resource depletion.”

    However, mass immigration from poor countries to rich countries will also impose problems whether cultural, security and financial and social problems.

    I have the feeling that we are discussing ‘The reverse osmosis of immigration”. The poor has the right to live, but also the right to get aids so as to better their lives where they are rather than migrating to unwelcoming lands.

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