POWERED BY STORYTELLING ❖ CRAFTED BY THE BEST WRITERS ON THE PLANET

CLICK BELOW TO REDISCOVER HUMANITY

The Sales Shrink – The Power of a Well-Timed Touch

by Tina Cherpes, Featured Contributor

Behavior Therapy #14

KIM HAD BEEN working as a server in a busy downtown restaurant for the past three years and was thrilled with her new found strategy to boost her take-home pay.  “I don’t know if this sounds weird to you but I swear when I started touching my clients, my tips doubled.”

Research consistently reveals that a well-timed, non-sexual touch can be a powerful influence of behavior and even the lightest touch on the upper arm can influence the sales shrinkway we think and act.

Published in The Journal of Social Psychology we learn that when lightly touched on the arm, strangers were nearly 50% more likely to help the experimenter pick up things they had dropped than those who were not touched.

From the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, we explore the effect of touch on our willingness to comply through a study that asked participants to sign a petition. While 55% signed without being touched, the number jumped to 81% when the participants were touched once on the upper arm. A later study asked people to fill in a questionnaire; touch increased the participants’ willingness to comply by 75%.

In the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology we learn that a well-timed touch encouraged participants to return lost money.  From Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, we learn that while touch did not effect the ratings of the server, the restaurant’s atmosphere, or the dining experience, tipping rates were significantly larger (something Kim intuitively knew) when patrons had been lightly touched by their server.

While these studies demonstrate the effect touch can have on our generosity, compliance, and willingness to help, being touched can have quite different meanings depending on the situation, culture, and/or gender involved.  Without a doubt, there are portions of the population that don’t like to be touched at all during social interactions and would undoubtedly not respond positively in any of the situations previously described.  Nonetheless, for the vast majority, non-sexual touch is a powerful influence and when we’re first attempting to influence someone through touch, a light, 1-2 second touch on the arm can be a non-threatening place to start.

**********
We invite you to join our community….. TheSalesShrink


BIZCATALYST 360°https://www.bizcatalyst360.com/about/
We are an Award-Winning global media digest, operating under the umbrella of 360° Nation, encompassing a wide range of multimedia enterprises, including; 360° Nation Studios —dedicated to reaching across the world in an effort to capture, produce, and deliver positive, uplifting messages via game-changing productions such as HopeFest 360°, and BucketFest 360°. We also operate GoodWorks 360° —a pro-bono consulting foundation focused entirely on providing mission-critical advisory services to nonprofits worldwide. With an emphasis on action, our 800+ international contributors empower people to transition from knowing what to do to actually doing it. Today and every day, we simply deliver the very best insights, intelligence, and inspiration available anywhere, doing it our way by placing our writers and our audience at the forefront. It's magical. It's evergreen. And quite frankly, It's just good stuff. Period.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Paul, thanks so much for taking the time to read the post and for sharing your industry insight and depth of experience; I appreciate your feedback!

    With regards,
    Tina

    P.S. Congratulations on the release of your upcoming new book, Rising Above A Toxic Workplace (love the title); I’ll look forward to reading it this Fall!

  2. Tina, thanks for this helpful article on the power of appropriate touch. We have found in our work with work groups that physical touch in the workplace is primarily spontaneous celebration (a high five when a meeting goes well; a fistbump when a problem is solved; a congratulatory handshake when a sale is closed. We have found it is one of the five languages appreciation — with each person having their own preferred language and desired actions.

    thanks!

    Paul White, PhD
    co-author, The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace
    http://www.appreciationatwork.com

DAILY INSPIRATION. DELIVERED.

PROUD RECIPIENT OF THE WEB MARKETING ASSOCIATION 2020 "STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE" AWARD