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Every Kid Needs A Champion

Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.'” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.

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TED: Ideas Worth Spreading
TED: Ideas Worth Spreadinghttps://www.ted.com/
TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). TED began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment, and Design converged, and today covers almost all topics — from science to business to global issues — in more than 100 languages. Meanwhile, independently run TEDx events help share ideas in communities around the world.

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2 CONVERSATIONS

  1. When we were kids we had champions and heroes. They were named Sky King, Babe Ruth, Roy Rogers, and Miss Jones, our first grade teacher. These were people that worked for good. They worked hard to be the best they could be. They risk everything to help others. Or in the case of a teacher they knew everything. A kid then could look at a champion and say, “I want to be like that when I grow up”. We were proud of those people. We related to them.

    Kids today have a different field of vision as to champions and heroes. Far too many see a sports figure that refuses to honor our flag or national anthem. Or the neighborhood drug dealer or pimp that has a fancy car and flashes a lot of money. Or the movie star that dances around in their underwear while saying they are embarrassed to be an American. Too many business people and educators don’t really give a flip about how they are seen by kids. Even parents often fall short of being the hero that their kids should respect and look up to as a guiding light.

    So how is that working out?

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