We celebrate bold entrepreneurs whose ingenuity led them to success, but what happens to those who fail? Far too often, they bury their stories out of shame or humiliation — and miss out on a valuable opportunity for growth, says author and entrepreneur Leticia Gasca. In this thoughtful talk, Gasca calls for business owners to open up about their failures and makes the case for replacing the idea of “failing fast” with a new mantra: fail mindfully.


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Aldo Delli Paoli

Letting yourself go to an emotional reaction in response to failure is better than responding with reason. Emotions push us to improve at the next opportunity.
A natural tendency after a failure is sometimes to suppress emotions and to cognitively rationalize what happened, but if people knew the possible negative effects of this behavior, they could ignore this tendency and focus on negative feelings. This should lead to learning and a better future decision-making process “