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Do You Focus On Blind Spots?

One of my all-time favorite movie scenes is in Back to the Future.  Biff Tannen, the bully, has just returned George McFly’s car via tow truck!  Biff tells George he should have been warned about the blind spot before the car was loaned to him.  He said “I could have been killed!”

Then, wimpy George stutters, “Now, Now, Biff, now I never noticed that the car had any blind spot before when I would drive it.”  To which Biff retorts: “What are you, blind, McFly?  How else do you explain that wreck out there?”  And George gets taken once again while his ashamed son, Marty, watches on.

Truth be told, we all have blind spots!  Just like every car, truck, van, or SUV, every person has spots where we are unable to see what we need to see.  The answer to the question, “What are you, blind?” is a “Yes!” for all of us!  We are all blind!  We all have things we cannot see.  Sometimes, they even cause “life accidents.”

Today, my purpose is not to talk so much about blind spots.  We all have them, and it would be well to know them and learn to strengthen ourselves in those areas.  Today, I wish to speak more about how we often ride around in the blind spots of others!  I want to help us all change that practice.

I recall my Driver Education Class and learning about blind spots.  I learned (unlike Biff and George!) that my car had them.  I also learned it was unwise to ever coast along in someone’s blind spot.  They cannot see you; it is dangerous, and could result in an accident.  We would do well on the road to be careful about riding in someone’s blind spot!

The same is true for life.  How often do we notice the weaknesses of others and focus on them?  How often do we find ourselves irked and irritated by what we think are the negative and displeasing aspects of other people?  Let’s face it!  We all have flaws and shortcomings.  They can be so easy to spot.  If we allow them, they can also become major irritants.

So, what should we do when we notice weaknesses and shortcomings in others?  I am asking we do what we would be advised to do by a driving instructor.  We should  move in front, move to the side, or slow down and step back.

Will you allow me to be your driving instructor for life on this issue of personal blind spots?  At least for me, will you please do the following when you encounter a blind spot in me?  These three things will help me (and perhaps all of us) when heading down the roads of life.

Get Behind Me

If you notice a blind spot in me that causes you concern, please slow down, get behind me, and then cheer me on.  Offer me kind words and encouragement.  I love to hear people cheer, “You can do it!”   Root for me!  Praise me!  Offer your support and make it known!  Please try the phrase, “You can make it!”

READ MORE AT WOMEN’S VOICES MAGAZINE

Jim R. Jacobshttp://www.drivinglessonsforlife.com/
Jim R Jacobs is a brave creator who strives to do mighty things! Jim is a Certified Daring Way Facilitator helping others to live more brave and authentic lives! He is the author of Driving Lessons For Life: Thoughts on Navigating Your Road to Personal Growth. Jim speaks professionally, and coaches others to success and living with integrity. He is a counselor, educator, innovator, father, and friend. Please check out Jim R. Jacobs and Driving Lessons For Life and find Jim on social media! Let's connect and dare mighty things!

4 COMMENTS

  1. Jim, your article is poignant and reminds me of the saying, “When you are pointing your finger at someone, there are three pointing back at you.” It is best to look inside ourselves with quiet reflection for then we have more compassion for the blindspots in others.

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